Ex- Felons voting rights Should ex-felons be able to vote once they complete their sentence in prison? In different states, there are different laws which mean some states go about felon voting differently. There are 9 states who permanently banned you from voting.

Each of the fifty states in the U.

why should felons be allowed to vote essay

Despite the severity of disenfranchisement, the federal government has yet to release any national regulations clarifying this injustice. Felons should be.

why should felons be allowed to vote essay

Although felons are a criminal who have committed a dangerous crime by rebelling against the law and have been punished by politics and government of the United States the right not to vote; as a result they were denied of voting right.

However, taking away the right to vote is like appealing against the constitution of the fourteen amendments which state that every person have the right to be free from discrimination and to have the equal of the law. Therefore, felons should be given the right. People debate on whether or not the people who have committed these crimes should be able to vote or if that right should be taken away.

The majority of people believe the individuals who commit these crimes should still retain their right to vote, which is true. A felony is a violent crime, it is considered to be more serious than a misdemeanor. When committing a felony it would be punishable to more than a year in prison.

Felonies tend to be. In this case you can conclude that no matter how large or small the charge, the ex-felon was convicted of that their rights for voting should not simply be given. Convicted felons in many states have forever lost those rights. Therefore, being able to reinstate their right to vote. Felons should have the right to vote no matter what their past may be. To get a better idea of how important this issue is we will.

Going to prison is a life changing experience for a human. Whether or not a person is changed for the better is the discussion that is open for debate. This then provokes the question of what rights ex-felons deserve to have. Voting is seen by some as a guaranteed right that government should not be allowed to touch, while other argue that committing a crime that is punishable.

Americans and other former slaves to be able to contribute in one of the most important duties of citizenship. So, states began to make laws to take away the rights of someone who had committed a crime in an attempt to take away the voting rights of African Americans who at that time made up the majority of people who had some sort of time in jail. Then by eighty percent of the states in the U. Using felon disenfranchisement laws divides the.

Felon disenfranchisement serves as a barrier between individuals who are qualified to vote and those who are not. The reasons that felons are not qualified to make such important. Felon disenfranchisement and the variation of state laws on disenfranchisement is a huge issue that affects the American presidency.

For example, if you are convicted felon you may never be able to vote again depending on the state you reside in.

Why Convicted Felons Should Not Be Allowed to Vote

Many states however, allow convicted criminals to regain their right to vote upon completing their sentence, while other states never take their convicted criminal's right to vote away from them. As a nation this reveals the division among states, and the. Should Felons Be Able to Vote? Yet, they do not have the same rights they did before they were arrested.This essay discusses my reflection on whether or not felons should have the right to vote.

A felon is defined as a person who has been convicted of a felony, which is a crime punishable by death or a term in state or federal prison. A felony is a serious crime usually punishable by imprisonment or death. Convicted felons should not be allowed to vote. Many Americans were not allowed to vote these past elections. Once someone has committed a serious crime or felony, they have shown that they are not trustworthy enough to vote.

Because they disobeyed the law, they should not have the obligation to vote. If one is sent to prison, they have agreed that most of their rights have been taken. Prison is meant to be a punishment and one of their punishments is their loss of freedom and democratic rights for their time of their sentence. Convicted felons have also demonstrated poor judgment and should not be trusted with a vote.

The main point of a prison sentence to show the offender and society that criminal behavior results in loss of freedom and most of the rights that freedom has to offer. Therefore felons should not be allowed to vote. Although some people believe that felons should be allowed to vote at any circumstance but I believe that if they are felons they have already lost that opportunity because they have decided to make the choice to participate in criminal activities.

If the felon is not willing to follow the law himself, then they should not demand the right to vote. In California, felons serving time in prison or county jail are denied their right to vote. According to The Sentencing Project, 5. Unfortunately, statistics show that this number is expected to rise to 6 million. Convicted felons are in prison for a reason, they committed a crime that was of a serious nature, whether it be robbing a bank, killing someone, etc. We do not need these type of people to help make decisions to choose the nations leaders.

They obviously could not make a decision governing their own lives, we should definitely not allow them to make those kind of decisions for the rest of us. I believe voting is not just a right but a responsibility.Photo: Paul J.

A fundamental right of United States citizenship is having your voice heard by voting to elect representatives. However, at least six million U. Losing the right to vote is among numerous other consequences of being convicted of a crime. This so-called " civil death " suggests that person is considered dead to society.

The larger political consequence is a lack of representation in government of a large group of citizens who are largely poor and people of color.

I study the impact of being convicted on individuals and communities. States have a variety of rules and regulations when it comes to voting rights and felony convictions. In some states, when a person is convicted they are barred from voting until they successfully complete prison, probation, or parole.

But in 12 statespeople convicted of felonies are barred from voting for life. In response to growing concern that these laws disenfranchise large segments of America's citizens, several states have recently made substantial, yet controversial, changes to voting rights of ex-felons.

This may be a growing movement. InVirginia's Governor Terry McAuliffe took executive action to restore voting rights to at leastex-felons. In July, the Florida Supreme Court heard arguments in a case about whether laws excluding felons from the right to vote are constitutional. In November, the state will vote on a ballot measure to restore ex-felon's voting rights automatically upon completion of their sentence.

These decisions will impact a large segment of Florida's voting-age population and continue to build a strong precedent for other states. Florida has historically played an important role in American elections. Yet roughly 10 percent of Floridians can't vote because they have been convicted of felonies.

Research suggests that, had these Americans been able to cast their vote for president in the election, Florida would have been a blue state. Studies show that ex-felons largely vote Democrat, and in this case would have made an impact in a presidential election.

However, critics point out that many felons do not vote even if their rights are restored. That may be true, but research shows that, for many ex-felons, it's because they don't know they can. This means fewer people have input in electing representatives who generally support causes important to them such as rehabilitation for offenders and criminal justice reform.

Some pundits and legal scholars argue that felons should not be eligible to vote because when people commit crime they violate the " social contract.

Should Felons Be Allowed to Vote? Essay

This reasoning says that those who break it, say by committing a crime, are no longer entitled to the benefits of the contract, such as political representation. People who study criminal behavior often say the opposite is true. They argue that restoring voting rights may, in fact, reinstate the social contract and improve factors that led the individual to commit crime in the first place.

In research I conducted, and headed by professors Beth Huebner and Timothy Bynum, we spoke with people returning from prison about how their felony conviction affected their life after release. One participant whose name is protected under a confidentiality agreement, stated: "Not being able to vote restricts our voice.

Another participant stated how his inability to vote about things important to him, like justice reform, meant that other voters might reinforce laws and restrictions that affect him: "Those are usually the people who want to put harsher rules and penalties and categorize everybody the same.

I feel that they allow more and more of those laws to be piled on us because we're not allowed to speak our minds. Americans who have been convicted and stripped of their right to vote often feel that they can't see themselves as citizens who are giving back to the community if they are denied participation in the political process.

why should felons be allowed to vote essay

Restoring voting rights signals to all citizens that those who have served their time for a past crime can participate in a key mechanism of civic engagement: voting.

Participating in civic life is associated with reductions in recidivismso an inclusive approach to democracy can only strengthen the political process. That's because the interests of more Americans, especially those historically silenced, will be heard through their vote. Moreover, research has shown that denying voting rights affects not just individuals, but also families and entire communitiesespecially those typically underrepresented in political arenas like people of color and those in poverty.

Inapproximately 70 percent of individuals in prison were people of color, despite making up only 25 percent of the U. Researchers attribute some of this racial disparity to sentencing laws and policies resembling what's been termed by Michelle Alexander as " The New Jim Crow. Restricting ex-felons from voting really says that, if you have committed a crime in the U. That message suggests that they are always second- or third-class citizens.We use cookies to give you the best experience possible.

An estimated 5. Each state has its own laws on disenfranchisement. While Vermont and Maine allow felons to vote while in prison, nine other states permanently restrict certain felons from voting. Proponents of felon re-enfranchisement say that felons who have paid their debt to society by completing their sentences should have all of their rights and privileges restored.

They argue that efforts to block ex-felons from voting are unfair, undemocratic, and politically or racially motivated. Don't use plagiarized sources. Opponents say felon voting restrictions are consistent with other voting limitations such as age, residency, sanity, etc.

Should Felons Be Allowed? Essay

They say that convicted felons have demonstrated poor judgment and should not be trusted with a vote. Some people say that there is nothing wrong with voting, everyone should have the right to do it. Voting is just giving your opinion. In the United States people are allowed to state their opinion. Felons are still affected by laws made by politicians. Laws could be made about the court system or anything else that might have an impact on their lives.

Since they are still a part of our democratic society, it would be wrong to take away the right to choose the people affecting them. While others disagree by stating that there is a reason why they are behind bars in the first place. They lost that privilege when they committed the crime, plain and simple.

They made the decision to commit a felony, which proves they are incapable of making good decisions for society. They know what crime they are committing, and if they do not know what crime they are committing that is bad luck. Ignorance is no excuse when it comes to the law. I also believe that convicted felons are in prison for a reason.

They committed a crime that was of a serious nature, whether it be robbing a bank, killing someone, raping someone, grand theft auto, etc.We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. About 5. Each state has its own laws on disenfranchisement.

Bernie Sanders: The right to vote should be extended 'even for terrible people'

Nine states in America completely restrict felons from voting while Vermont and Maine permit felons to vote while in prison. Advocates of felon re-enfranchisement think felons who have actually paid their financial obligation to society by completing their sentences need to have all of their rights and privileges restored.

They argue that efforts to block ex-felons from ballot are unreasonable, undemocratic, and politically or racially encouraged. Don't use plagiarized sources. Opponents of felon ballot say the limitations are consistent with other ballot restrictions such as age, residency, psychological capacity, and other felon limitations such as no weapons for violent transgressors. They say that convicted felons have actually shown poor judgment and ought to not be relied on with a vote.

I think convicted felons need to be allowed to vote upon release from jail since they work out profundity; in addition, withholding their right to vote would be an infraction of the US Ballot Rights Act of and the 8th modification. One factor ex-felons are not enabled to vote is because of their viewed judgment. Moreover, he thinks that criminals belong in this category due to the fact that individuals who devote severe criminal activities have actually shown that they are not reliable.

On the other hand, Steve Chapman, Writer and Editorial Author at the Chicago Tribune, thinks we let ex-convicts wed, replicate, purchase beer, own property, and drive. They do not lose their flexibility of religion, or their right versus self-incrimination, but in lots of locations, the presumption is that they can not be trusted to help choose our leaders.

The function of a jail is to secure society and rehabilitate the wrongdoer.

why should felons be allowed to vote essay

Rehab refers to activities developed to change bad guys into law abiding people, and consist of supplying instructional courses in jail, mentor job abilities, and offering therapy. If we thought that detainees could not be rehabilitated, then they should not be released. If felons are released, we make a judgment that they are fit to live in society; therefore, they are capable of making trustworthy decisions. The Voting Rights Act of is a landmark piece of legislation in the United States that outlawed discriminatory voting practices that had been responsible for the widespread disenfranchisement of African Americans in the United States.

Section Two of the Voting Act contains a general prohibition on voting discrimination. Furthermore, Congress amended this section to prohibit any voting practice or procedure that has a discriminatory result or prohibits a group of people from voting.

New York is one state that restricts felony voting. In the New York Election Lawit clearly disqualifies a group of people, incarcerated felons and felons on parole, from voting in elections.

This is a blatant violation of the Voting Rights Act of Further, prohibiting felons from voting is a violation of the eighth amendment of the United States Constitution. The eighth amendment prohibits excessive penalties and demands that the punishment fits the crime. As a result, states that exclude felons from voting permanently, including Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Florida, are in violation of this amendment.

On one hand, opponents of felon voting use the Fourteenth amendment to justify disenfranchising convicted felons. They believe in limiting the freedoms of convicted felons. Incarceration is designed to punish inmates and impress upon them the magnitude of their crimes.The right to vote is a right that according to law is entitled to everyone, once you have reached the legal age of But what happens if you break the law?

Do you still have the right to choose elected officials, or once the law has been broken, has the right to vote been forfeited? According to the constitution the Fourteenth Amendment grants to the states the authority to deny voting rights to anyone that has a criminal conviction. On paper this does seem to be pretty valid, if you break the law, things that at one time you were entitled to are now no longer allowed.

There are two points in regards to why convicted felons should vote:. There are arguments in regards to both of these points. When you look at the war on drugs, many of the convicted felons happen to be minorities; and when voter turnout is low, it does favor the Republican Party, all one needs to do is to look at the mid-term elections ofwhere voter turnout was the lowest since World War II; and there is pretty solid data, that the majority of voters from minority backgrounds do vote liberal.

What are the reasons though why felons should not be able to vote? Like everything else, there are limits to freedom, as ironic as that sounds. These are also valid points, and one needs to be responsible, but if people have paid their debt to society, it is important to integrate them into society. When felons are still doing time, should they still be allowed? I would say no, but when their debt is paid it is important to bring them back, and allowing them to vote is essential.

Need help with essay? Follow this link: Purchase essay online to get your essay done by expert essay writer. Looking for responsible essay writing service? Should Felons Be Allowed To Vote The right to vote is a right that according to law is entitled to everyone, once you have reached the legal age of There are two points in regards to why convicted felons should vote: Felons are still a part of society, and do engage in the democratic process.

If laws are changed affecting the court system, this very well could impact their lives. The other point is this is one of many ways that lawmakers, in particular members of the Republican Party have tried to disenfranchise voters.Each of the fifty states in the U.

Despite the severity of disenfranchisement, the federal government has yet to release any national regulations clarifying this injustice. Felons should be. A felon is a person who commits serious, sometimes violent, crimes that are punishable by several years of imprisonment and in severe cases, death. Once they have finished serving their sentence, ex-felons return to the world under a set of regulations designed to limit their interaction with society, which ultimately protects the public.

However, protests regarding the constitutionality of some of these limitations have come to the attention of the public, especially concerning the removal of the. Should Felons Be Able to Vote? Going to prison is a life changing experience for a human. Whether or not a person is changed for the better is the discussion that is open for debate. This then provokes the question of what rights ex-felons deserve to have.

Voting is seen by some as a guaranteed right that government should not be allowed to touch, while other argue that committing a crime that is punishable by prison. Individuals convicted of a felony should not lose their right to vote. The right to vote is a birth right for citizens born in this country. This right is taken for granted by many and is exercised by far too few. As the United States prepares for its 57th presidential election over five million of its citizens will be denied their right to participate in the electoral process.

Why would such a large number of people be denied a constitutional right? They have been excluded from voting. Felon disenfranchisement serves as a barrier between individuals who are qualified to vote and those who are not. The reasons that felons are not qualified to make such important. Although felons are a criminal who have committed a dangerous crime by rebelling against the law and have been punished by politics and government of the United States the right not to vote; as a result they were denied of voting right.

However, taking away the right to vote is like appealing against the constitution of the fourteen amendments which state that every person have the right to be free from discrimination and to have the equal of the law. Therefore, felons should be given the right. Using felon disenfranchisement laws divides the people of the United States and should not be allowed.

Image by Pexels Currently in the United States, only 12 states allow felons to vote after they have completed their time in prison and 2 states that actually allow felons to vote while in prison. While 19 states allow it after the sentence, parole, and probation and there are three states where felons are completely banned from voting. This man is a felon, and his right to vote has been taken away.

Approximately 5. Although it can be argued that felons have lost their privilege to vote, felon disenfranchisement has affected and still affects a disproportionate amount of people of color, takes out a huge voter block, and inhibits the rehabilitation process. Therefore, community members should sign petitions or contact senators to help felons regain their rights. One of those consequences is losing the right to vote.